Dianne Poston Owens

Arts & Photography

Author Profile

Dianne Poston Owens

Dianne Poston Owens is a former newspaper reporter, columnist and editor, serving rural communities in South Carolina for more than 30 years. Though she wandered from her roots, she now lives in the same neck of the woods that her family has lived and died on for more than 250 years.

Books

Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane

Working Title: Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane

This Book Is In Development

Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane

Arts & Photography

A Southern journalist, Dianne Poston Owens has learned a thing of two about people and community—that people want to know their lives matter, their pets won’t rat them out, and that they are not alone. As an observer and recorder of people, places and things, she understands that every day is a new day, and each day is played out in tandem and in gathering. 'Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane' is a collection of short essays intended to be read for inspiration and encouragement. Owens poses questions and offers photographs that allow readers the opportunity to reflect and pause before forging ahead. Written with charming wit, Southern twang and a deepness that is drawn out by nature, Owens explores what we see, say, and choose, and how we connect to the people we interact with in the “communities” in which we gather.

Rough-Cut Book Bubbles from Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane

Sometimes it is best to leave the mess

“Some trash is better left on the floor.” That phrase captured my attention and made me check myself. I’ve long been a proponent of picking up my messes. If I drop food, I may even retrieve it and continue eating, though that does depend on my hunger pains and the consistency of the food dropped. I drop a napkin in a restaurant and it floats to the back corner under the booth, I feel compelled to contort and retrieve it. Granted, I don’t reuse it, unless necessity dictates, but alas, I’ve cleaned up my mess. This compulsion, though, has often led me to trying to clean up messes I did not make. I’ve learned, that’s not really my job. New rule: if you can’t catch it before it hits the floor, let it go. What are we wasting our time trying to fix? What can we do instead of trying to fix this thing? To read my essay, Leave the Mess, purchase a copy of Gatherings, Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane; and thank you!

Are you Merlee?

We are all someone to someone. By that, I mean we have people who influence us, mentor us, lead us, and, sometimes, keep us in check. I remember a man named Merlee. Mr. Merlee. If I try really hard, I might remember his last name. But we all called him Mr. Merlee. First name basis. With that fine dash of Southern respect. Mr. By remembering him, I realize how he impacted my younger self. So, the question is who am I influencing? I imagine there are folks watching me, some known to me and someone unknown to me. I wonder if I am their Mr. Merlee. We are all someone to someone.

Where do you rest?

Connectedness. Disconnectedness. Rest. Are you weary? Do you flit about? Community. Does the thought of living in community with those around you, and in sub-communities within communities, bring you peace and comfort or anxiety and stress? In Gathering, Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane I offer readers an opportunity to take a moment, reflect on the world around them and unplug just for a bit before forging headlong back into the world. Where do you enjoy resting?

Get the help you need

Get the help you need to do whatever it is you need to get done. Need medical attention? Go, see the doctor! Need your house painted? Buy the paint and the brushes and do it, or hire that man who keeps telling you he can paint the house for you. Why do we put things off? We have not because we ask not. One day I woke up and determined it was the day to stop not getting the help I needed to accomplish what I've wanted to do since I was 11 years old: publish a book. I asked for help, got the help I needed, and now there is a book. Why bother to spend your money and time reading Gathering? I wrote it to make you a little happier by entertaining and inspiring you for a moment. We can all use a little more joy in our down-time, right? Each essay is followed by a couple of questions to cause the reader to reflect on what was read. The book also has photographs to remind us about the world around us, you know, where we gather. Gathering would never have seen the light of day if not for the support of my family, my writing and critique partners, and Bublish, Inc. Thank you all for your support!

Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane

Working Title: Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane

This Book Is In Development

Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane

Arts & Photography

We are the makers of subcultures. Of all our communities, where are we the happiest? As an award-winning Southern journalist, Dianne Poston Owens has learned a thing or two about people and community – that people want to know their lives matter, their pets won’t rat them out, and that they are not alone. An observer and recorder of people, places and things, she understands that every day is a new day, and each day is played out in tandem and in gathering. Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane is a collection of short essays intended to be read for inspiration and encouragement. Owens poses questions and offers photographs that allow readers the opportunity to reflect and pause before forging ahead. Written with charming wit, Southern twang and a deepness that is drawn out by nature, Owens explores what we see, say, and choose, and how we connect to the people we interact with in the “communities” in which we gather.

Rough-Cut Book Bubbles from Gathering: Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane

The world can keep its crap!

How's it going? It's Friday when I"m writing this and I'm filled with hope for the weekend. I have some plans. Hope all goes well. That sort of thing. In my book "Gathering, Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane," I write about motivation. Where it comes from, where it goes. You can see an excerpt of that essay, but to read the rest of the story, you'll have to get the book! Suffice it to say, for this weekend, the world can keep its crap! I've got plans ... and I will choose my disposition ... I will be happy. I will find joy. I hope you do, too! In the meantime, be the joy the world needs!

Scat and leaving tracks ...

... What tracks are you following? Where do these tracks take you? What tracks do you leave behind? Take a moment to ponder how you conquer your fears and move on. Ralph Waldo Emerson is credited with saying “He who is not everyday conquering some fear has not learned the secret of life.” To that, I add the words of Nelson Mandela, “The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.” I still jump when surprised and upon occasion let out a scream when startled, whether by critter, human or myself. But as Louisa May Alcott said, “I’m not afraid of the storms, for I’m learning how to sail my ship.” Go forth. Scare. Be scared. Sail on… leave a few tracks in the sand ...

Keeper of old things

I'm the keeper of old things. Old typewriters. Bottles. Farm implements. My house is in some ways a museum of a slice of Americana. But I am enamored with technology, especially new technologies. I had a wireless telephone the minute one was available. My Mazda was outfitted with a speaker so I could drive hands free. It was crude by Bluetooth standards of today, but it was top-of-line, cutting-edge. I saw the beauty in communicating while traveling, then and now. Even old-school fax machines are magic to me. I put a photo in here, and it comes out there. The original is unchanged. A faux original exists elsewhere. Magic. The original text messaging system. With technology, life moves at no less then the speed of light and sound, 770 miles per hour and 900,000 times faster than that. Wow! I once heard someone say that we shouldn't get married to today's technology. If we do that, we can't move forward. At whatever speed we want to. Check out this excerpt from an essay in my book "Gathering, Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane."

Homecomings

High schools, colleges, and universities have them. Where I'm from, churches have them. Usually in October. Sort of a harvest festival. Homecomings. Homecomings are those gatherings where people you know and remember, along with the ones you've forgotten and will get to know anew, get together to remember a time, a place, an organization -- that special something that was once shared. Perhaps you're returning home after a journey and the cat is there to jump off the table, which it was emphatically told not to jump onto, in its greeting of your return. Homecoming ... I hope you enjoy this excerpt from Gathering, Homespun Essays from Beech Tree Lane about "Home."

Pass the gator, pass on the snake

Here we are at the time of year when summer gives way to autumn. Change is afoot. Go ahead, say "yes" to getting out, enjoying the cooler temperatures and changing colors. In fact, say "yes" to expanding your horizons and doing the different. Once upon a time I had an occasion to make a bold choice and the opportunity to try a different food item. When you find yourself with the opportunity to try something new, do it. Even if you only learn to never try that new food again!

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